Monthly Archives: July 2016

Philadelphia Police fulfilled their duty to protect people’s right to Protest – Great work!

According to amnesty international, Police in Philadelphia handled protesters very well fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression, police officers from other states should learn something from Philly police

Amnesty Insider 2016

PROTECTING THE RIGHT TO PROTEST

Amnesty International USA deployed a delegation of human rights observers to monitor protests and marches in Cleveland and Philadelphia for the political conventions – in order to help ensure that people’s human right to protest peacefully is respected.

Our observers in Cleveland saw mostly peaceful protests, with police securing march routes and taking steps to ensure the safety of protesters and the public. We are still reviewing notes and videos of the citations that police gave to protestors to better understand the context and the police response.

Now in Philadelphia, our team has been seeing peaceful protest, with police largely appearing to be fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. You can read more about the delegation of human rights observers here. You can follow more updates on our Twitter and Facebook.

In the weeks ahead, Amnesty will send letters to law enforcement leaders in both cities – and state and federal policymakers – outlining what the observers saw and what lessons can be drawn from how the protests were handled.

INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Margaret HuangWe’ve had powerful reminders this month of how important it is to ensure that people’s rights are respected everywhere, with the shootings of and by police in the U.S., the attacks in Nice, Mogadishu, Munich, Baghdad, Dhaka and Kabul, the brutal crackdown following the failed coup in Turkey, and so many other events.

Amnesty International’s work has never been more critical – and it’s never been more important for us to have a strong voice in the U.S. that’s connected to our global movement.

Last week, AIUSA Board Chair Ann Burroughs and I were in Barcelona to meet with the directors and chairs of other Amnesty International sections across the globe and plan our shared work as a movement. It was inspiring to share experiences and ideas with our colleagues from around the world. We addressed a number of key issues including governance reform proposals that would replace the current International Council Meeting (ICM) with a new Global Assembly; a new procedure for discussing and adopting contentious policies; and the new global campaign for refugees which launches in September. We’ll be sharing more about these discussions with you in the weeks and months ahead.

From AIUSA’s observer delegations in Cleveland and Philadelphia to researchers documenting human rights crises in Turkey, Saudi Arabia and all around the world, Amnesty is always focused on defending the human rights of every person–no matter who or where they are.

None of this work is possible without you. Your support and activism make Amnesty the powerful force for change in so many places around the world.

Thank you!

Margaret Huang
Interim Executive Director
Amnesty International USA

Turkey Coup

TURKEY: HARD-WON RIGHTS CANNOT BE TAKEN AWAY

The Turkish authorities’ reaction to a bloody failed coup attempt on July 15 was swift and brutal, unleashing a troubling crackdown.

Detainees have been denied food, water and medical treatment, and verbally abused and threatened. Some have been subjected to severe beatings and torture.

Amnesty International is pressing Turkish authorities to condemn torture and other ill-treatment in places of detention, and take concrete steps to end abuses. We need to make sure hard-won human rights in Turkey are respected, protected and fulfilled. The state of emergency must not roll back human rights in Turkey.

Take Action Now.

Saudi Arabia UNHRC

SUSPEND SAUDI ARABIA FROM UN HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL

The evidence is mounting—Saudi Arabia has committed gross and systemic violations of human rights abroad and at home, and used its position on the UN Human Rights Council to obstruct justice for possible war crimes.

Saudi Arabia has executed minors, killed civilians in airstrikes and blocked investigations into possible war crimes, all since joining the UN Human Rights Council. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have come together to demand that the international community hold Saudi Arabia accountable.

Join us in calling on the UN General Assembly to immediately suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council.

Donate to AmnestyRaif Badawi, a blogger in Saudi Arabia, withstood 50 excruciating lashes. His full sentence requires a total of 1,000 lashes and 10 years of confinement – all because he published a blog that promoted religious freedom.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia’s government sits on a key human rights body – the UN Human Rights Council.

This hypocrisy cannot stand.

Saudi Arabia’s government has used its position on the Human Rights Council to shield itself from accountability. That’s why Saudi Arabia should be suspended from the Council. Donate and support our work pressuring UN member states to take action.

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2016 Regional ConferencesThe 2016 Regional Conferences promise to be some of the best we’ve ever had.No matter which AIUSA region you call home, you’ll have an incredible time hearing from inspiring speakers, networking with other activists, learning about the most pressing human rights issues of our time, developing your organizer skill set and shaping AIUSA policy.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity. Stay in the loop by saving the date and learning more about your regional conference on our website.

 

Don’t miss! Clinical dialogues around race, gender, and embodied psychotherapy Sept 30, 2016

EARLY BIRD ENDS JULY 31ST! 
 
WANT TO COME WITH SOME COLLEAGUES? BECOME A HOST!
SEE DETAILS BELOW



The Gestalt Therapy Institute of Philadelphia’s three-year, experiential program is one
weekend per month from September through early May, easily done while working.
    • Build strong clinical community
    • Take your skills to a more creative, risk taking, and deeper level,
    • Integrate yourself with your clinical work and your politics,
    • Learn so much about yourself in the process!

    

Host Committee

Want to get more involved? Be a part of the Host Committee! Purchase five or more tickets to receive a discount, connect with the Therapy Center network, and join us as a committee member at the event.

*  5+ tickets, use HOST5 for a 10% discount at purchase
*  10+ tickets, use HOST10 for a 15% discount at purchase

   

3 Continuing Education Credits
(for psychologists, social workers, and other mental health professionals)

SEMINAR DESCRIPTION

Therapy Center of Philadelphia (TCP) is in its fourth year of hosting a seminar for clinicians and community to come together and engage in a clinically scholarly dialogue around social justice issues and implications for therapy. Past seminars have explored the implications of feminist therapy in today’s world, implications of social location, privilege, and marginalization in the therapy relationship, as well as clinical issues for women/trans women experiencing homelessness or the aftermath of war. Our keynotes have included Dr. Nancy McWilliams, Dr. Beverly Greene, and Dr. Maureen Walker.
Building on these themes and in response to our current national climate, this year TCP offers a clinical conversation around how different bodily experiences present in the therapy space. We want to propose that attending to the body in different clinical ways can build healing and transformation. We want to examine how the interweaving of political and cultural forces impact one’s body and how we address this therapeutically. Specifically we want to examine how our bodies become targets of marginalization that create strategies of disconnection – from the self and from each other.
Using our own social locations as well as our own embodied experiences, speakers will explore the varying ways the clinical relationship can support a client to move beyond the oppressive stance of physical disposability (how certain bodies/people/communities are treated as more disposable and experience more violence) to an experience of agency, accountability, collectivity, and presence. Building on our own agency’s journey in the last few years, we will focus on how we become disconnected from ourselves and others because of racism, sexism, and trans-phobia. The panel will discuss how we as therapists can use exploration of body experience as an important way into the clinical work, particularly as it relates to internalized oppression, shame, and lack of safety.
LEARNING OBJECTIVES
*  Identify how our bodies can become targets of marginalization that creates strategies of disconnection – from the self and from each other.
*  Learn how to recognize and make conscious the different ways that experiences of oppression and privilege become manifest in the body.
*  Apply theories of embodied and gestalt psychotherapies as important ways into the clinical healing process, particularly as it relates to internalized oppression, shame, and lack of safety.

*  Discuss how we as therapists can use our own social locations as well as our own embodied experiences to support a client to create an experience of agency, accountability, collectivity, and presence.
SCHEDULE
8:30-9:00 am Registration, Networking, and Hot Breakfast
9:00 am -12 pm Clinical Program
12:00-12:30 pm Closing and Evaluations
CONTINUING EDUCATION
This program is co-sponsored by the Philadelphia Society of Psychoanalytic Psychology (PSPP). PSPP is the local Chapter of Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) of the American Psychological Association. This program is intended for mental health professionals of all experience levels and all theoretical orientations. It is not limited to individuals practicing in a psychoanalytic mode.
Responsibility for Content:
Division 39 is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Division 39 maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
Psychologists:
This program, when attended in its entirety, is offered for 3 continuing education credits. Participants must attend 100% of the program. Upon completion of a conference evaluation form, a certificate will be issued. This serves as documentation of attendance for all participants.
Social Workers and Other Mental Health Professionals:
Social Workers, Marriage and Family Therapists, and Professional Counselors in Pennsylvania can receive 3 CEs from CE providers approved by the APA. Since Division 39 is approved by the APA to sponsor continuing education, these professionals will be able to fulfill their continuing education requirements by attending PSPP/Division 39 approved programs.
Educators:
Act 48 credits are available to participants who hold an educational certificate in Pennsylvania. If you need Act 48 credits, please be sure to bring your PPID number to the event. Act 48 credits are processed by PSPP, and you will receive a letter in the mail documenting that you have earned 3 Act 48 credits a few weeks after the conference.
Participant’s Accessibility and Non-discrimination, and Ethics:
TCP, PSPP, and Division 39 are committed to accessibility and non-discrimination in continuing education activities and strive to conduct all activities in strict conformity with the American Psychological Association’s Ethical Principles for Psychologists. Participants are asked to be aware of the need for privacy and confidentiality throughout the program. If program content becomes stressful, participants are encouraged to process these feelings during discussion periods. Participants with special needs will be accommodated as possible.
If you believe that a violation of ethics has occurred during this presentation, or if you have concerns about such issues as handicapped accessibility, distress with regard to program content or other complaints, please contact Courtney Slater, Ph.D. at 267-225-1522 or e-mail courtney.l.slater@gmail.com.
There is no commercial support for this program nor are there any relationships between the CE sponsor, presenting organization, presenter, program content, research, grants or other funding that could reasonably be construed as conflict of interest. During the program, the presenter will discuss the validity/utility of the content/approach as well as the limitations of the approach and most common risk factors, if any.

ANNOUNCEMENT
HIRING A CLINICAL SUPERVISOR – SOCIAL WORKER
TCP is hiring a new Clinical Supervisor to join its supervisory team.  The team, led by the Clinical Director, provides clinical oversight and supervision to all clinicians, including senior level therapists, associates obtaining hours for clinical licensure, and students. In line with its mission, the team also plays a strong role with the Executive Director and Board to guide program and policy directions for the agency.
This is an exciting opportunity for an experienced clinician with special interest and experience in clinical work, gender, and social justice issues. The Center is growing, and as we expand the supervisory team, our focus is on giving clinical staff opportunities for varied clinical expertise and style. Our clinicians come from diverse backgrounds and offer expertise in psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, gestalt therapy, and contextual family therapy approaches; CBT,  and mindfulness. TCP has specific programs focusing on trauma work utilizing EMDR, trauma – sensitive yoga, music therapy for transgender and gender non-conforming individuals, and a program for LGBT prospective parents.  TCP is fully trans-affirming and inclusive.
This is an independent contractor position.  The average hours are 10-15 a month. Opportunities to carry a small case load of clients can be considered too.

We Rise With Yazidi Women! One Billion Rising & Yazda Call on the World for Global Solidarity With and For Yazidi Women on 3 August

We Rise With Yazidi Women! One Billion Rising & Yazda Call on the World for Global Solidarity With and For Yazidi Women on 3 August

This 3 August marks the two-year anniversary of the brutal attack of the Yazidi people in Sinjar Province in the Northern region of Iraq, Two years since IS or ISIL (also known as ISIS or Daesh) stormed towns, villages, and historic homelands of the ethno-religious group, killing over 5,000 men and elders, enslaving over 7,000 women and children and displacing over 400,000 more. Two years since the humanitarian crisis in which thousands of internally displaced Yazidis were trapped on Sinjar Mountain, surrounded by Isis fighters determined to exterminate the indigenous group, dying of exposure and dehydration. Two years since the ongoing genocide of the Yazidi people began, including the desecration of homes, holy sites and women’s bodies.

The recently published Chilcot report in the UK, which revealed that former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair, and his major allies – including former US President George Bush had illegally waged war in Iraq in March 2003 and militarily occupied it – further reiterates the connection that the Iraq War contributed to the rise of IS or ISIL in the region.

Nadia Murad is a 23-year-old victim of Isil’s crimes in Iraq and one of the thousands of Yazidi women who were abducted and enslaved by IS or ISIL. She was brutally raped by more than 12 members over a period of three months and was among the more than 5,000 Yazidi women taken captive when IS or ISIL swept through the group’s communities in Northern Iraq. After her escape, Nadia spoke out about her horrific experiences at the hands of IS or ISIL fighters to draw attention to the ongoing genocide. She has described how she and other young women were forced to pray before they were raped, and how they were treated as they were bought and sold like “sabia” – slaves.

“We were not worth the value of animals. They raped girls in groups, They did what a mind could not imagine. They commit rape and genocide crimes in the name of Islam. When they took me to Mosul to rape me, I forgot about my mother and brothers. Because what they were doing to the women was more difficult than death” – Nadia Murad

YAZDA is a global Yazidi organization who provides support for the victims of the genocide.

ON 3 AUGUST, WE CALL ON THE WORLD TO SHOW SOLIDARITY FOR NADIA MURAD AND THE THOUSANDS OF YAZIDI WOMEN AND GIRLS SOLD AND CAPTURED AS SEX SLAVES – AND CALL FOR THE IMMEDIATE RELEASE OF THE CAPTURED 3,000 YAZIDI WOMEN.

WE CALL ON THE WORLD TO HONOR THE GENOCIDAL ATTACK ON SINJAR TWO YEARS AGO. WE AS A GLOBAL COMMUNITY, MUST KEEP THEIR STORIES AND THEIR SITUATION VISIBLE WITH THE STRENGTH OF OUR SOLIDARITY.

ORGANIZE SOLIDARITY EVENTS AND ACTION IN YOUR COMMUNITIES. Here are some suggested actions:

MARCHES. VIGILS. WALKS. SOLIDARITY VIDEOS AND PHOTOS

SHOW YOUR SOLIDARITY ONLINE ON SOCIAL MEDIA.  LETS FILL THE GLOBE ONLINE WITH OUR SUPPORT FOR OUR YAZIDI SISTERS AND OUR DEMAND FOR JUSTICE FOR THEM.

USE THE HASHTAG: #StopYazidiGenocide

READ more about the context of the Yazidi genocide >

Suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council

Suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council

Get Involved

The al-Shaymeh Education Complex for Girls after it was struck by missiles fired by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition

We just called for the UN General Assembly to suspend Saudi Arabia from the world’s top human rights body.

Help us do more to champion human rights. Donate now.

This is intolerable.

Saudi Arabia has used its position on the UN Human Rights Council to shield itself from human rights investigations.

Since joining the Council in 2013, Saudi Arabia’s dire human rights record at home has plummeted, and the government has also led a devastating campaign of unlawful airstrikes against civilians in the next-door country of Yemen.

Help support our work to demand that Saudi Arabia’s government respects human rights. We are pressuring all UN member states to take action.

The list of violations is long:

    • More than 350 people – including children – have been executed In Saudi Arabia since it was elected to the Council.
    • Saudi Arabia used its membership on the council to derail a resolution that would have investigated war crimes by the Saudi-led military coalition that bombed Yemen.
  • Human rights activists in Saudi Arabia have been harshly sentenced for peacefully expressing their opinions. Since 2014, Saudi’s Specialized Criminal Court has sentenced hundreds of activists – including Raif Badawi and his lawyer Waleed Abu al-Khair – to lengthy prison terms, and even to death, after grossly unfair trials. In May 2014, Raif Badawi was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for blogging about religious freedom.

The international community – including the United States and the U.K – has been deafeningly silent. President Obama even sold Saudi Arabia a billion dollars in additional bombs.

When it comes to Saudi Arabia, we must make sure the international community does not put business and arms deals before human rights. Donate now.

I hope you’ll be part of our efforts.

Sincerely,

Sunjeev Bery
Advocacy Director, Middle East North Africa
Amnesty International USA

1960s Zanzibar a happy Island – Cultures Exposures – ViWiDA-USA

Cultures Exposures
Expose yourself to different cultures and appreciate humans as they are. It is the elimination of racial differences

Intended to educate and empower the followers about other people cultures in order to gain knowledge, which may come in handy when visiting, or doing business in an environment where they differ in cultures and/or, in places where cultures and religion may seem to intertwine when compared to their own cultures.


We have started a new endeavor in order to include our wonderful community in the chance to bring about miracles and to help others.