Philadelphia Police fulfilled their duty to protect people’s right to Protest – Great work!

According to amnesty international, Police in Philadelphia handled protesters very well fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression, police officers from other states should learn something from Philly police

Amnesty Insider 2016

PROTECTING THE RIGHT TO PROTEST

Amnesty International USA deployed a delegation of human rights observers to monitor protests and marches in Cleveland and Philadelphia for the political conventions – in order to help ensure that people’s human right to protest peacefully is respected.

Our observers in Cleveland saw mostly peaceful protests, with police securing march routes and taking steps to ensure the safety of protesters and the public. We are still reviewing notes and videos of the citations that police gave to protestors to better understand the context and the police response.

Now in Philadelphia, our team has been seeing peaceful protest, with police largely appearing to be fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. You can read more about the delegation of human rights observers here. You can follow more updates on our Twitter and Facebook.

In the weeks ahead, Amnesty will send letters to law enforcement leaders in both cities – and state and federal policymakers – outlining what the observers saw and what lessons can be drawn from how the protests were handled.

INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Margaret HuangWe’ve had powerful reminders this month of how important it is to ensure that people’s rights are respected everywhere, with the shootings of and by police in the U.S., the attacks in Nice, Mogadishu, Munich, Baghdad, Dhaka and Kabul, the brutal crackdown following the failed coup in Turkey, and so many other events.

Amnesty International’s work has never been more critical – and it’s never been more important for us to have a strong voice in the U.S. that’s connected to our global movement.

Last week, AIUSA Board Chair Ann Burroughs and I were in Barcelona to meet with the directors and chairs of other Amnesty International sections across the globe and plan our shared work as a movement. It was inspiring to share experiences and ideas with our colleagues from around the world. We addressed a number of key issues including governance reform proposals that would replace the current International Council Meeting (ICM) with a new Global Assembly; a new procedure for discussing and adopting contentious policies; and the new global campaign for refugees which launches in September. We’ll be sharing more about these discussions with you in the weeks and months ahead.

From AIUSA’s observer delegations in Cleveland and Philadelphia to researchers documenting human rights crises in Turkey, Saudi Arabia and all around the world, Amnesty is always focused on defending the human rights of every person–no matter who or where they are.

None of this work is possible without you. Your support and activism make Amnesty the powerful force for change in so many places around the world.

Thank you!

Margaret Huang
Interim Executive Director
Amnesty International USA

Turkey Coup

TURKEY: HARD-WON RIGHTS CANNOT BE TAKEN AWAY

The Turkish authorities’ reaction to a bloody failed coup attempt on July 15 was swift and brutal, unleashing a troubling crackdown.

Detainees have been denied food, water and medical treatment, and verbally abused and threatened. Some have been subjected to severe beatings and torture.

Amnesty International is pressing Turkish authorities to condemn torture and other ill-treatment in places of detention, and take concrete steps to end abuses. We need to make sure hard-won human rights in Turkey are respected, protected and fulfilled. The state of emergency must not roll back human rights in Turkey.

Take Action Now.

Saudi Arabia UNHRC

SUSPEND SAUDI ARABIA FROM UN HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL

The evidence is mounting—Saudi Arabia has committed gross and systemic violations of human rights abroad and at home, and used its position on the UN Human Rights Council to obstruct justice for possible war crimes.

Saudi Arabia has executed minors, killed civilians in airstrikes and blocked investigations into possible war crimes, all since joining the UN Human Rights Council. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have come together to demand that the international community hold Saudi Arabia accountable.

Join us in calling on the UN General Assembly to immediately suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council.

Donate to AmnestyRaif Badawi, a blogger in Saudi Arabia, withstood 50 excruciating lashes. His full sentence requires a total of 1,000 lashes and 10 years of confinement – all because he published a blog that promoted religious freedom.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia’s government sits on a key human rights body – the UN Human Rights Council.

This hypocrisy cannot stand.

Saudi Arabia’s government has used its position on the Human Rights Council to shield itself from accountability. That’s why Saudi Arabia should be suspended from the Council. Donate and support our work pressuring UN member states to take action.

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2016 Regional ConferencesThe 2016 Regional Conferences promise to be some of the best we’ve ever had.No matter which AIUSA region you call home, you’ll have an incredible time hearing from inspiring speakers, networking with other activists, learning about the most pressing human rights issues of our time, developing your organizer skill set and shaping AIUSA policy.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity. Stay in the loop by saving the date and learning more about your regional conference on our website.