Tag Archives: fighting violence against women

Tanzania is the #CountryoftheWeek – YALI Network

Did you know that some of the world’s oldest human skulls have been found in Tanzania’s Odulvai Gorge, which is also known as the cradle of humankind? But you don’t have to go back 200,000 years to discover other interesting facts about Tanzania, this week’s #CountryoftheWeek. Learn more and get better connected with Tanzania by liking U.S. Embassy Tanzania for the latest news!

Explaining ISIS – Securing a better future

Also known as Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) and Islamic State (IS).

ISIS aims to create an Islamic state called a caliphate across Iraq, Syria and beyond.The group is implementing Sharia Law, rooted in eighth century Islam, to establish a society that mirrors the region’s ancient past.

ISIS is known for killing dozens of people at a time and carrying out public executions, crucifixions, and other acts.

READ: ISIS goes global: 90 attacks in 21 countries have killed nearly 1,400 people

ISIS is believed to be holding 3,500 people as slaves, according to a 2016 United Nations report. Most of the enslaved are women and children from the Yazidi community, but some are from other ethnic and religious minority communities.

Swearing in new Woman Deputy Secretary-General @UN

Ms. Amina J. Mohammed was Minister of Environment of the Federal Republic of Nigeria from November 2015 to December 2016, where she steered the country’s efforts on climate action, protecting the natural environment and conserving resources for sustainable development.
Prior to this, she served as Special Adviser to Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Post-2015 Development Planning, where she was instrumental in bringing about the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, including the Sustainable Development Goals.

Before joining the UN, Ms. Mohammed worked for three successive administrations in Nigeria, serving as Special Advisor on the Millennium Development Goals, providing advice on issues including poverty, public sector reform and sustainable development, and coordinating programs worth $1 billion annually for MDG-related interventions.

The OIG for the DHS announced it will be reviewing DHS’ implementation of President Trump’s immigration ban





U.S. immigration officials detained refugees, as well as holders of valid U.S. visas and green cards, from seven majority-Muslim nations: Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen following the orders from Washington.

Trump signed an executive order Friday indefinitely barring all Syrian refugees from entering the United States and suspending all refugee admissions for 120 days. It also prohibits citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for 90 days, whether they are refugees or not.

The Office Inspector General (OIG) for the Homeland Security Department (DHS) announced late Wednesday that it will be reviewing DHS’ implementation of President Trump’s immigration ban, signed by Mr. Trump on Friday.

Growth potential for urbanization – Tanzania Economy

VIWIDA-USA improves and enriches the life experiences of Women and Youth across the globe.

Developing Tanzania to meet the growing population.

Tanzania economy has developed since 2015 due to an economic outlook that’s very diversify, but Tanzania need to find a winning sector that will enable them to compete in an international scale.

OBAMA FAREWELL TO YALI NETWORK

Hello Young Leaders!

President Obama waving from airplane with rainbow behind him

As I leave office, I wanted to take a moment to thank you. Your involvement in the Young Leaders Initiatives– YALI, YSEALI, and YLAI– has demonstrated the power of young people to make positive change in their communities. Whether you are an entrepreneur, work for an NGO, serve your government, or are still a student, you have proven that you are prepared to tackle the challenges we face as global citizens.

Wherever I have traveled around the world, I have seen the impact of this generation. You aren’t waiting for permission; you’re taking action where you see the greatest need. I’ve seen firsthand the remarkable efforts of the nearly half a million young people that are a part of the Young Leaders Initiatives in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. You’ve fought for the rights of the disabled and the LGBT community. You’re taking steps to reverse the effects of climate change. You’re starting businesses that are helping your economies grow. And, you’re using music and art to fight violent extremism and promote pluralism.

While I will no longer be the President of the United States, I will continue to find ways to empower young leaders across the world. I want to stay in touch with you. Click here [https://act.barackobamafoundation.org/Stay-In-Touch] to stay connected with me and find ways we can continue to make positive change.

I believe in you and look forward to working together in the future.

–Barack Obama

Hurry! Time is running out to take these exclusive courses!

Can you believe the #YALILearns Challenge officially ends next week? It is amazing how quickly the time has gone! While you have until October 1 to earn your special #YALILearns badge by submitting your event report, the new Learn to Lead courses will no longer be available after next week. Here are the courses you could miss out on if you don’t take action now:

#YALIGoesGreen
The YALI Network Learn to Lead #YALIGoesGreen courses not only provide a basic understanding of climate change, but also teach you how to put your green plan into action!

Going Green for Social Entrepreneurs
Going Green for Business Entrepreneurs
#Africa4Her

Many girls can’t fulfill their dreams of receiving an education or starting their own business, just because of their gender. Our Learn to Lead #Africa4Her courses will help you learn ways to address this issue in your community.

Skill Building for Girls Advocacy
Empowering Women Entrepreneurs
#YALIVotes

The #YALIVotes courses are a great way to learn communication, networking, and team management skills that you can use to lead your community. After you take these two courses, you will be able to organize your own grassroots advocacy campaign and connect with public officials in your community.

Engaging with Public Officials for Positive Change
Organizing Grassroots Advocacy Campaigns

So, if you haven’t taken a Learn to Lead course yet, don’t delay–these Learn to Lead courses will be gone before you know it!

Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness

 

As a housing provider, you can play a big role in supporting the education of young people experiencing homelessness. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, a federal law, governs the implementation of Pennsylvania’s Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness (ECYEH) Program. Currently, there are over 26,000 K-12 students in Pennsylvania (2014-15 data) that may need additional support due to their homeless status. These students include those children and youth who:

  • are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship or a similar reason; are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; are living in emergency or transitional shelters; are abandoned in hospitals;
  • have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings;
  • are living in cars, parks, public spaces or abandoned buildings, sub- standard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings; and
  • are “migratory children” (see further information regarding homeless students in the Education for Homeless Youth Basic Education Circular at  www.education.state.pa.us/homeless)

There are many resources to assist in these efforts through the regional network of ECYEH coordinators – go to http://homeless.center-school.org to see the regional map for local program contact information.  And if you are not connected with the local school district homeless liaison/s in your area, visit the statewide online liaison directory at http://homeless.center-school.org/ homeless directory  for a complete liaison listing.  At this site, you will also find a listing of family/youth shelters available to families with children and unaccompanied youth.  If your program/agency is not listed, or if the information needs to be updated, please contact your ECYEH regional coordinator.

 

Free leadership development training is available for families of children who receive Infant-Toddler Early Intervention or Pre-School Early Intervention Services.  Competence and Confidence Partners in Policymaking for Families in Early Intervention (C2P2EI) will be offered in four 2-day sessions: October 28-29, December 2-3, January 27-28, and April 28-29 at the Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center. For more information contact Cathy Roccia-Meier at cathyRM@temple.edu or visit http://disabilities.temple.edu/programs/leadership/c2p2ei.shtml

Philadelphia Police fulfilled their duty to protect people’s right to Protest – Great work!

According to amnesty international, Police in Philadelphia handled protesters very well fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression, police officers from other states should learn something from Philly police

Amnesty Insider 2016

PROTECTING THE RIGHT TO PROTEST

Amnesty International USA deployed a delegation of human rights observers to monitor protests and marches in Cleveland and Philadelphia for the political conventions – in order to help ensure that people’s human right to protest peacefully is respected.

Our observers in Cleveland saw mostly peaceful protests, with police securing march routes and taking steps to ensure the safety of protesters and the public. We are still reviewing notes and videos of the citations that police gave to protestors to better understand the context and the police response.

Now in Philadelphia, our team has been seeing peaceful protest, with police largely appearing to be fulfilling their duty to protect people’s right to freedom of peaceful assembly and expression. You can read more about the delegation of human rights observers here. You can follow more updates on our Twitter and Facebook.

In the weeks ahead, Amnesty will send letters to law enforcement leaders in both cities – and state and federal policymakers – outlining what the observers saw and what lessons can be drawn from how the protests were handled.

INTERIM EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Margaret HuangWe’ve had powerful reminders this month of how important it is to ensure that people’s rights are respected everywhere, with the shootings of and by police in the U.S., the attacks in Nice, Mogadishu, Munich, Baghdad, Dhaka and Kabul, the brutal crackdown following the failed coup in Turkey, and so many other events.

Amnesty International’s work has never been more critical – and it’s never been more important for us to have a strong voice in the U.S. that’s connected to our global movement.

Last week, AIUSA Board Chair Ann Burroughs and I were in Barcelona to meet with the directors and chairs of other Amnesty International sections across the globe and plan our shared work as a movement. It was inspiring to share experiences and ideas with our colleagues from around the world. We addressed a number of key issues including governance reform proposals that would replace the current International Council Meeting (ICM) with a new Global Assembly; a new procedure for discussing and adopting contentious policies; and the new global campaign for refugees which launches in September. We’ll be sharing more about these discussions with you in the weeks and months ahead.

From AIUSA’s observer delegations in Cleveland and Philadelphia to researchers documenting human rights crises in Turkey, Saudi Arabia and all around the world, Amnesty is always focused on defending the human rights of every person–no matter who or where they are.

None of this work is possible without you. Your support and activism make Amnesty the powerful force for change in so many places around the world.

Thank you!

Margaret Huang
Interim Executive Director
Amnesty International USA

Turkey Coup

TURKEY: HARD-WON RIGHTS CANNOT BE TAKEN AWAY

The Turkish authorities’ reaction to a bloody failed coup attempt on July 15 was swift and brutal, unleashing a troubling crackdown.

Detainees have been denied food, water and medical treatment, and verbally abused and threatened. Some have been subjected to severe beatings and torture.

Amnesty International is pressing Turkish authorities to condemn torture and other ill-treatment in places of detention, and take concrete steps to end abuses. We need to make sure hard-won human rights in Turkey are respected, protected and fulfilled. The state of emergency must not roll back human rights in Turkey.

Take Action Now.

Saudi Arabia UNHRC

SUSPEND SAUDI ARABIA FROM UN HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL

The evidence is mounting—Saudi Arabia has committed gross and systemic violations of human rights abroad and at home, and used its position on the UN Human Rights Council to obstruct justice for possible war crimes.

Saudi Arabia has executed minors, killed civilians in airstrikes and blocked investigations into possible war crimes, all since joining the UN Human Rights Council. Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch have come together to demand that the international community hold Saudi Arabia accountable.

Join us in calling on the UN General Assembly to immediately suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council.

Donate to AmnestyRaif Badawi, a blogger in Saudi Arabia, withstood 50 excruciating lashes. His full sentence requires a total of 1,000 lashes and 10 years of confinement – all because he published a blog that promoted religious freedom.

Meanwhile, Saudi Arabia’s government sits on a key human rights body – the UN Human Rights Council.

This hypocrisy cannot stand.

Saudi Arabia’s government has used its position on the Human Rights Council to shield itself from accountability. That’s why Saudi Arabia should be suspended from the Council. Donate and support our work pressuring UN member states to take action.

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2016 Regional ConferencesThe 2016 Regional Conferences promise to be some of the best we’ve ever had.No matter which AIUSA region you call home, you’ll have an incredible time hearing from inspiring speakers, networking with other activists, learning about the most pressing human rights issues of our time, developing your organizer skill set and shaping AIUSA policy.

Don’t miss out on the opportunity. Stay in the loop by saving the date and learning more about your regional conference on our website.