Tag Archives: Homelessness

The OIG for the DHS announced it will be reviewing DHS’ implementation of President Trump’s immigration ban





U.S. immigration officials detained refugees, as well as holders of valid U.S. visas and green cards, from seven majority-Muslim nations: Iraq, Syria, Iran, Sudan, Libya, Somalia and Yemen following the orders from Washington.

Trump signed an executive order Friday indefinitely barring all Syrian refugees from entering the United States and suspending all refugee admissions for 120 days. It also prohibits citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for 90 days, whether they are refugees or not.

The Office Inspector General (OIG) for the Homeland Security Department (DHS) announced late Wednesday that it will be reviewing DHS’ implementation of President Trump’s immigration ban, signed by Mr. Trump on Friday.

Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness

 

As a housing provider, you can play a big role in supporting the education of young people experiencing homelessness. The McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, a federal law, governs the implementation of Pennsylvania’s Education for Children and Youth Experiencing Homelessness (ECYEH) Program. Currently, there are over 26,000 K-12 students in Pennsylvania (2014-15 data) that may need additional support due to their homeless status. These students include those children and youth who:

  • are sharing the housing of other persons due to loss of housing, economic hardship or a similar reason; are living in motels, hotels, trailer parks or camping grounds due to the lack of alternative adequate accommodations; are living in emergency or transitional shelters; are abandoned in hospitals;
  • have a primary nighttime residence that is a public or private place not designed for or ordinarily used as a regular sleeping accommodation for human beings;
  • are living in cars, parks, public spaces or abandoned buildings, sub- standard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings; and
  • are “migratory children” (see further information regarding homeless students in the Education for Homeless Youth Basic Education Circular at  www.education.state.pa.us/homeless)

There are many resources to assist in these efforts through the regional network of ECYEH coordinators – go to http://homeless.center-school.org to see the regional map for local program contact information.  And if you are not connected with the local school district homeless liaison/s in your area, visit the statewide online liaison directory at http://homeless.center-school.org/ homeless directory  for a complete liaison listing.  At this site, you will also find a listing of family/youth shelters available to families with children and unaccompanied youth.  If your program/agency is not listed, or if the information needs to be updated, please contact your ECYEH regional coordinator.

 

Free leadership development training is available for families of children who receive Infant-Toddler Early Intervention or Pre-School Early Intervention Services.  Competence and Confidence Partners in Policymaking for Families in Early Intervention (C2P2EI) will be offered in four 2-day sessions: October 28-29, December 2-3, January 27-28, and April 28-29 at the Lancaster Host Resort and Conference Center. For more information contact Cathy Roccia-Meier at cathyRM@temple.edu or visit http://disabilities.temple.edu/programs/leadership/c2p2ei.shtml

Suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council

Suspend Saudi Arabia from the Human Rights Council

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The al-Shaymeh Education Complex for Girls after it was struck by missiles fired by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition

We just called for the UN General Assembly to suspend Saudi Arabia from the world’s top human rights body.

Help us do more to champion human rights. Donate now.

This is intolerable.

Saudi Arabia has used its position on the UN Human Rights Council to shield itself from human rights investigations.

Since joining the Council in 2013, Saudi Arabia’s dire human rights record at home has plummeted, and the government has also led a devastating campaign of unlawful airstrikes against civilians in the next-door country of Yemen.

Help support our work to demand that Saudi Arabia’s government respects human rights. We are pressuring all UN member states to take action.

The list of violations is long:

    • More than 350 people – including children – have been executed In Saudi Arabia since it was elected to the Council.
    • Saudi Arabia used its membership on the council to derail a resolution that would have investigated war crimes by the Saudi-led military coalition that bombed Yemen.
  • Human rights activists in Saudi Arabia have been harshly sentenced for peacefully expressing their opinions. Since 2014, Saudi’s Specialized Criminal Court has sentenced hundreds of activists – including Raif Badawi and his lawyer Waleed Abu al-Khair – to lengthy prison terms, and even to death, after grossly unfair trials. In May 2014, Raif Badawi was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes for blogging about religious freedom.

The international community – including the United States and the U.K – has been deafeningly silent. President Obama even sold Saudi Arabia a billion dollars in additional bombs.

When it comes to Saudi Arabia, we must make sure the international community does not put business and arms deals before human rights. Donate now.

I hope you’ll be part of our efforts.

Sincerely,

Sunjeev Bery
Advocacy Director, Middle East North Africa
Amnesty International USA

Alicia’s new film Let Me In launches today. Watch it here.

Stand as one with people forced to flee conflict and disaster

Beautiful Family,

Today, June 20th is World Refugee Day.

I’m not an expert on the refugee crisis, but I am just like you – a human, a woman, a mother, a daughter, and a friend. When I learned that there are more refugees living in the world today than at any other point in history, and half of them are children, it totally took my breath away! It left me to wonder what if this was me? My sons? My family? My life?

I want you to imagine if you were a refugee if you were the one torn from the arms of your families and loved ones….one of 60 million people displaced with nowhere to call home. What would you do? How would you feel?

These are the questions my new film, Let Me In, seeks to answer. We’ve partnered with Care, Oxfam, and War Child, on a campaign to raise awareness and reinvigorate the conversation around the global refugee crisis.


The film is set to my new song “Hallelujah,” and reimagines the refugee crisis on America’s shores, displacing thousands in the Los Angeles area who must seek safety by crossing the border into Mexico.

Sadly, some seek to fan the flames of division and turn us against our fellow neighbors, but We Are Here to make the case for love and compassion.

Please take a few minutes to watch the film and think about what millions of families are going through around the world. These are people just like us, with families and careers and dreams. Let’s tell them we’re standing with them.

http://weareheremovement.com/letmein
With Love Only and Always,
– Alicia

Help Stop the killing of people with albinism in Malawi!

Take Action: Help Stop the killing of people with albinism in Malawi!

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Take Action© LAWILINK/Amnesty InternationalAttacks against people with albinism have sharply increased in Malawi over the last two years, with four people, including a baby, murdered this past April alone.Take action now and support efforts calling on the government of Malawi to protect people with albinism.

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Whitney Chilumpha was just under two years old when she was snatched while sleeping with her mother in their home. Pieces of her skull, some teeth and clothing were found days later on a nearby hill.

Jenifer Namusyo, a 30-year-old woman, was found dead. She had been stabbed in the back, abdomen, and elbow.

Seventeen-year-old Davis Fletcher Machinjiri was abducted by a group of men who trafficked him to Mozambique, where he was killed and his arms and legs chopped off.

Right now there are five more people who have been abducted in Malawi and are still missing—their lives are in immediate danger.

Groups in Malawi are fighting to end this practice—but they need help. Call on the government of Malawi to urgently search for the five who are currently missing, and take steps to protect the life and security of people with albinism.

Today is International Albinism Awareness Day, and Amnesty International just released a report that shows at least 69 crimes against people with albinism have been documented since November 2014.

Amnesty International and other organizations on the ground are calling on the government of Malawi to adopt measures protecting the rights to life and security of people with albinism by providing increased levels of visible policing in rural districts and taking action when attacks occur.

Tell the government of Malawi to uphold its responsibility to protect people with albinism.

 

Want a Moonshot? – Racial Justice in America

We’re reminiscing about those heady days of 1962 when President John F. Kennedy announced that the United States was going to the Moon. Today, our version of a Moonshot is finally dealing with our historic and ongoing issues of racial injustice.

It won’t be easy. It will be difficult, but that’s what makes it even more worthwhile. As we enter the homestretch of Obama’s presidency, now is the time to come to terms with the inequities our fellow Americans have suffered throughout our history and make it right.

Sign this petition to call on President Obama to address the issues of race during his final months in office:

http://weareheremovement.com/moonshot/

The way to ameliorate the costs of making things right are directly equal to the cost of the Apollo Moon Landing. $150 billion directed at poor communities over the next 10 years, to provide access to equal education, good housing,  jobs and job training, making communities safer and an overhaul of the Justice system.

If we can spend $150 billion landing two men on the moon we can spend it raising up Americans of color to truly access the American Dream. Let’s hold out our hands to support our Brothers and Sisters of Color as we reboot the American Dream. Together.

Support a Moonshot today → http://weareheremovement.com/moonshot/

VICTORY: Phyoe Phyoe Aung Released

Today, prisoners of conscience Phyoe Phyoe Aung and her husband Lin Htet Naing were released along with other protesters who had been arrested in Myanmar for their activism.

Phyoe Phyoe AungThis is a huge victory for human rights and human rights defenders.

The detention of Phyoe Phyoe Aung (on the right in the picture) followed nationwide student protests, which started in 2014 and ended with the beating of students by police in Letpadan in March 2015. Scores of students and their supporters were arrested and detained throughout the country.

Finally, the demand for their freedom has been heard, and alongside many others, Phyoe Phyoe Aung and her husband now walk free.

While this is a step in the right direction, the government of Myanmar must release all remaining prisoners of conscience and ensure wholesale reform so that the country can end the cycle of discrimination, politically motivated arrests and imprisonment, and other human rights abuses once and for all.

Phyoe Phyoe Aung and other human rights defenders are vital to shaping the country’s future—it’s crucial that the government works to create space in civil society for them to operate freely.

With the world’s attention on Myanmar, we will celebrate the release of the protesters and challenge the Myanmar government to break away from the deeply repressive policies that for years have fueled arbitrary arrests and repression.

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Block the bombs: Stop the $1 billion U.S. arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

STOP: $1 Billion U.S. Arms sale to Saudi Arabia

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Yemenis walk on the rubble of a wedding hall which was reportedly hit by a Saudi Arabia-led coalition air strike. The U.S. Government risks complicity in the actions of the Saudi Arabia-led coalition as they commit violations of international humanitarian law.

Block the bombs: Stop the $1 billion U.S. arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

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It’s the war that no one is talking about. Thousands of civilians have been killed and injured by the Saudi Arabia-led coalition since the conflict began in Yemen.

Where is Saudi Arabia getting the bombs to do it? One major seller is the U.S. Government.

And now President Obama has authorized the sale of over 18,000 bombs and 1,500 warheads to Saudi Arabia—but these bombs have not yet been delivered.

Act Now: Urge President Obama and Congress to cancel the arms sale to Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia’s government has led a devastating campaign of unlawful air strikes and bombardment of civilian targets in the next-door country of Yemen.

Yemen is in a humanitarian crisis, with over 2.5 million displaced, and 82% of the population in need of some form of humanitarian assistance.

While all sides have committed violations, a UN report found that Saudi Arabia-led coalition airstrikes were responsible for most of the civilian deaths in Yemen’s conflict.

The Saudi Arabia-led coalition declared the entire city of Sa’da—civilian homes included—a military target, which is in direct violation of international humanitarian law.

Tell President Obama and Congress that the U.S. should not sell bombs and arms to countries who are using them to commit human rights abuses and violations of the laws of war.            Take action today.

Saudi Arabia is the largest arms sales customer of the U.S.

Based on Amnesty International’s evidence of civilian targeting, putting more U.S. bombs in the hands of Saudi Arabia’s military will only make matters worse for civilians in Yemen.

Thank you for your activism,

Sunjeev Bery
Advocacy Director, Middle East North Africa
Amnesty International USA

Take Action! Donate Now!

Amnesty International USA

 

Are you Ready? It’s Coming March 1st. #Africa4her

yali_56d35510c6c128.03740416Investing in women and girls is not only the right thing to do, it’s the smart thing to do. That’s because each action you take to increase a woman’s access to equal opportunity in the workplace, to let girls learn, and to eliminate gender-based violence benefits your community, country, and continent.

On March 1st the YALI Network will again turn its attention to #Africa4Her, a Network-wide initiative to spur awareness and positive action around the issues that keep women and girls from reaching their full potential. Over the coming weeks, YALI Network members can show their support for #Africa4Her by engaging in the activities we’ve outlined for the campaign.

Visit yali.state.gov/4her to pledge and learn what you can do throughout the campaign:

  • On March 1 start by pledging to invest in women and girls in your community. Once you make your pledge you will receive a personalized graphic with your name and pledge to share with your friends on your social media platforms.
  • On March 2 at 13:30 UTC join the conversation with a Twitter #YALICHAT with the Ambassador-at-Large for global women’s issues, Cathy Russell! Start asking questions today by tweeting at @YALINetwork using #YALICHAT and #Africa4Her.
  • Get inspired with the young African leaders at YALICreatives and submit, photos, art, videos or music that help tell a story of inspiring women and girls or individuals working with them in your community. Find more information at yalicreatives.com/africa4her/.
     
  • Later on this month, take our new YALI Network Online Course, Understanding the Human Rights of Women and Girls and earn a certificate. Once you have taken the course go out and educate your community by hosting a #YALILearns event and then tell us about it here.

There are more than 220,000 young African leaders in the YALI Network. Imagine the impact you could have on your community, your country and your continent if every one of you took an action to empower women and girls.

I look forward to pledging with you on March 1st!